City Research Online

Multiphase phenomena in Diesel fuel injection systems

Karathanassis, I. K. ORCID: 0000-0001-9025-2866, Koukouvinis, F. ORCID: 0000-0001-9025-2866 and Gavaises, E. ORCID: 0000-0003-0874-8534 (2019). Multiphase phenomena in Diesel fuel injection systems. In: Simulations and Optical Diagnostics for Internal Combustion Engines. Energy, Environment, and Sustainability. (pp. 95-126). Singapore: Springer. ISBN 978-981-15-0334-4

Abstract

Fuel Injection Equipment (FIE) are an integral component of modern Internal Combustion Engines (ICE), since they play a crucial role in the fuel atomization process and in the formation of a fuel/air combustible mixture, consequently affecting efficiency and pollutant formation. Advancements and improvements of FIE systems are determined by the complexity of the physical mechanisms taking place; the spatial scales are in the order of millimetres, flow may become locally highly supersonic, leading to very small temporal scales of microseconds or less. The operation of these devices is highly unsteady, involving moving geometries such as needle valves. Additionally, extreme pressure changes imply that many assumptions of traditional fluid mechanics, such as incompressibility, are no longer valid. Furthermore, the description of the fuel properties becomes an issue, since fuel databases are scarce or limited to pure components, whereas actual fuels are commonly hydrocarbon mixtures. Last but not least, complicated phenomena such as phase change or transition from subcritical to transcritical/supercritical state of matter further pose complications in the understanding of the operation of these devices.

Publication Type: Book Section
Additional Information: © Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020
Subjects: T Technology > TJ Mechanical engineering and machinery
T Technology > TL Motor vehicles. Aeronautics. Astronautics
Departments: School of Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering > Engineering > Mechanical Engineering & Aeronautics
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/23054
[img] Text - Accepted Version
This document is not freely accessible until 19 October 2020 due to copyright restrictions.

To request a copy, please use the button below.

Request a copy

Export

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics

Actions (login required)

Admin Login Admin Login