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Development of substructure and superelement codes for the FEA of tall slender buildings

Veletic, J (2020). Development of substructure and superelement codes for the FEA of tall slender buildings. (Unpublished Doctoral thesis, City, University of London)

Abstract

This thesis is concerned with the development of a finite element (FE) design and analysis capability for tall slender buildings (having a regular geometry) taking into consideration the need to create a computationally efficient code such that parametric studies can be performed speedily. In what follows, the current trend in tall slender buildings is discussed as well as the motivation for focusing on a structure having a regular cross-section over the height of the building. A reinforced concrete structural frame is adopted, as this is the dominant material now used for tall slender buildings. The focus of the FE analysis is the prediction of lateral displacements under wind loading.

The primary structural components in tall buildings are beams and plates. Beam Theory is reviewed and the derivation of the three-dimensional (3D) Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam stiffness matrix is given. In addition, the concepts behind 3D FE shell theory (used for the plate analysis, to represent the floor slabs and core walls) are described.

The report proceeds to discuss the master-slave approach and substructuring technique that are introduced in order to save memory and reduce the run time. A bespoke Matlab 3D mesh generator and graphical routines (to illustrate the meshes and the deformed structure) are also described.

Through the application of the Matlab codes SPARESEfeaTS and SEfeaTS (written by the author) a 120 storey 420m tall structure is analysed, allowing parametric studies to be undertaken to explore the efficiency of different structural members. Results are presented for the lateral displacements of the building under static wind pressure. The computational memory and run time savings of the two codes are discussed. It is shown that the resulting computation tools provide a novel, valuable capability for engineers carrying out preliminary designs of these tall elegant structures.

Publication Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: T Technology > TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General)
Departments: Doctoral Theses
Doctoral Theses > School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering Doctoral Theses
School of Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering > Engineering > Civil Engineering
Date Deposited: 06 Aug 2020 10:55
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/24693
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