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Inequality and the Economic Cycle: Disabled Employees’ Experience of Work During the Great Recession in Britain

Jones, M., Wass, V., Hoque, K. and Bacon, N. ORCID: 0000-0002-1031-1246 (2020). Inequality and the Economic Cycle: Disabled Employees’ Experience of Work During the Great Recession in Britain. British Journal of Industrial Relations: an international journal of employment relations,

Abstract

Using unique questions introduced into the 2011 British Workplace Employment Relations Study, a detailed matched employee-employer survey, this paper compares disabled and non-disabled employees’ experience of the 2008-2009 recession to contribute a cyclical perspective on disability-related disadvantage at work. We find that disabled employees are more likely to report recession-induced changes to workload, work organisation, wages and access to training, even after controlling for personal, job and workplace characteristics. There is limited evidence that workplace equality characteristics moderate these relationships to protect disabled employees. These findings have particular resonance in the context of the COVID-19 recession.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in British Journal of Industrial Relations: an international journal of employment relations, following peer review. The version of record Jones, M., Wass, V., Hoque, K. and Bacon, N. (2020). Inequality and the Economic Cycle: Disabled Employees’ Experience of Work During the Great Recession in Britain. British Journal of Industrial Relations: an international journal of employment relations to be available online at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/14678543
Publisher Keywords: Disability, Recession, Working Conditions, Workplace Employment Relations Study
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DA Great Britain
H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Departments: The City Law School > Academic Programmes
Date Deposited: 13 Oct 2020 13:20
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/25081
[img] Text - Accepted Version
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