City Research Online

Save the Children UK’s #blogladesh Campaign and the Change in Humanitarian Reporting

Cooper, G. ORCID: 0000-0003-2367-8626 (2021). Save the Children UK’s #blogladesh Campaign and the Change in Humanitarian Reporting. In: Tandoc, E. C., Jenkins, J., Thomas, R. and Westlund, O. (Eds.), Critical Incidents in Journalism: Pivotal Moments Reshaping Journalism Around the World. . London: Routledge. ISBN 9780367895341

Abstract

In 2010, Save the Children UK ran its blogladesh campaign, organizing a media trip to Bangladesh to raise awareness of the Millennium Development Goals. Save the Children UK had recently appointed Liz Scarff as its first digital media manager and tasked her with finding innovative ways of using social media to promote Save’s profile and campaigns. This chapter suggests that blogladesh challenged the boundaries of reporting humanitarian crises. The Cake Campaign saw both aid agencies exploring other ways to reach the public with humanitarian stories, while journalists themselves started to adopt the influence of the subjective in humanitarian reporting, as had happened in other areas of journalism. Blogladesh fulfills this definition of a critical incident because not only journalists but also their traditional source for humanitarian stories was affected by the way new entrants to the journalistic field and key aspects of boundary work came to the fore.

Publication Type: Book Section
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge/CRC Press in Critical Incidents in Journalism: Pivotal Moments Reshaping Journalism Around the World on 9 December 2020, available online: https://www.routledge.com/Critical-Incidents-in-Journalism-Pivotal-Moments-Reshaping-Journalism-around/Jr-Jenkins-Thomas-Westlund/p/book/9780367895341
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
P Language and Literature
Departments: School of Arts & Social Sciences > Journalism
Date Deposited: 24 Feb 2021 12:19
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/25706
[img] Text - Accepted Version
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