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Study of Optimal Perimetric Testing In Children (OPTIC): developing consensus and setting research priorities for perimetry in the management of children with glaucoma

Patel, D. E., Cumberland, P. M., Walters, B. C., Abbott, J., Brookes, J., Edmunds, B., Khaw, P. T., Lloyd, I. C., Papadopoulos, M., Sung, V., Cortina-Borja, M., Rahi, J. S., Walters, B., Cumberland, P., Russell-Eggitt, I., Timms, C., Moore, A., Garway-Heath, D., Viswanathan, A., Liasis, A., Crabb, D. P. ORCID: 0000-0001-8754-3902, Patel, D. and Rahi, J. (2021). Study of Optimal Perimetric Testing In Children (OPTIC): developing consensus and setting research priorities for perimetry in the management of children with glaucoma. Eye, doi: 10.1038/s41433-021-01584-0

Abstract

Background: Perimetry is important in the management of children with glaucoma, but there is limited evidence-based guidance on its use. We report an expert consensus-based study to update guidance and identify areas requiring further research.

Methods: Experts were invited to participate in a modified Delphi consensus process. Panel selection was based on clinical experience of managing children with glaucoma and UK-based training to minimise diversity of view due to healthcare setting. Questionnaires were delivered electronically, and analysed to establish ‘agreement’. Divergence of opinions was investigated and resolved where possible through further iterations.

Results: 7/9 experts invited agreed to participate. Consensus (≥5/7 (71%) in agreement) was achieved for 21/26 (80.8%) items in 2 rounds, generating recommendations to start perimetry from approximately 7 years of age (IQR: 6.75–7.25), and use qualitative methods in conjunction with automated reliability indices to assess test quality. There was a lack of agreement about defining progressive visual field (VF) loss and methods for implementing perimetry longitudinally. Panel members highlighted the importance of informing decisions based upon individual circumstances—from gauging maturity/capability when selecting tests and interpreting outcomes, to accounting for specific clinical features (e.g. poor IOP control and/or suspected progressive VF loss) when making decisions about frequency of testing.

Conclusions: There is commonality of expert views in relation to implementing perimetry and interpreting test quality in the management of children with glaucoma. However, there remains a lack of agreement about defining progressive VF loss, and utilising perimetry over an individuals’ lifetime, highlighting the need for further research.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Publisher Keywords: Glaucoma, Paediatrics
Subjects: R Medicine > RE Ophthalmology
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Optometry & Visual Science
Date available in CRO: 05 Aug 2021 08:42
Date deposited: 5 August 2021
Date of acceptance: 27 April 2021
Date of first online publication: 21 June 2021
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/26549
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