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Working from home and disabled people’s employment outcomes

Hoque, K. and Bacon, N. ORCID: 0000-0002-1031-1246 (2021). Working from home and disabled people’s employment outcomes. British Journal of Industrial Relations: an international journal of employment relations,

Abstract

This paper assesses disabled employees’ likelihood of working from home relative to non-disabled employees, and the implications of doing so for their experiences of work. Analysing British nationally representative data, the findings suggest disabled employees are less likely to work from home than non-disabled employees, given they are disproportionately excluded from the higher-paying and/ or managerial roles in which working from home is more widely available. In addition, organisations in which working from home is more commonplace do not employ a higher proportion of disabled people. The results also confirm disabled employees report poorer experiences of work than non-disabled employees regarding job control, job-related mental health, job satisfaction, and work-life balance. Although working from home is positively associated with these outcomes (except for work-life balance) for both disabled and non-disabled employees, there is very little evidence it is associated with smaller disability gaps in these outcomes. Therefore, our analysis questions the potential for working from home to reduce disability disadvantage within organisations, and highlights the need for more substantial action to address the barriers to employment that disabled people encounter.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Hoque, K. and Bacon, N. (2021). Working from home and disabled people’s employment outcomes. British Journal of Industrial Relations: an international journal of employment relations, which has been accepted for publication in British Journal of Industrial Relations. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
Departments: Bayes Business School > Management
Date available in CRO: 16 Sep 2021 08:45
Date deposited: 16 September 2021
Date of acceptance: 15 September 2021
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/26757
[img] Text - Accepted Version
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