“It’s Tough but it’s Worth it”: Psychosocial Counsellors’ Experience of Working with Iraqi Refugees in Jordan: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

Miqdadi, D. (2015). “It’s Tough but it’s Worth it”: Psychosocial Counsellors’ Experience of Working with Iraqi Refugees in Jordan: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. (Unpublished Doctoral thesis, City University London)

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Abstract

This research study focused on exploring the experiences of psychosocial counsellors who were working with Iraqis who had fled to Jordan after the 2003 regime change. The extensive research on the effects of trauma work on therapists has been focused on the negative effects of trauma work and is mostly quantitative. Research into the experience of psychosocial counsellors in Jordan is largely absent from the established literature. Utilising an interpretative phenomenological analysis, the current study explored the lived experiences of six psychosocial counsellors in Jordan in some depth. The three master themes that were identified were: (1) the impact of sociopolitical and socioeconomic factors; (2) enriching and motivating aspects of their roles; and (3) coping with the distressing aspects of their roles. The results of this study support previous research in the sense that secondary traumatic stress and vicarious trauma symptoms were found to be a part of the participants’ experiences. The study also supports newly emerging research that suggests that the negative and positive effects of trauma work with individuals affected by political violence are a simultaneous part of counsellors’ experiences. The reciprocal nature of trauma work is also discussed. Rich descriptions of the participants’ experiences are presented and discussed. Implications for psychosocial service providers and supervisors are considered, along with limitations of the research study and directions for future research.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Psychology
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/12477

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