Development of a new splanchnic perfusion sensor

Hickey, M. & Kyriacou, P. A. (2007). Development of a new splanchnic perfusion sensor. Paper presented at the 29th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 22-26 Aug 2007, Lyon, France.

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Abstract

the continuous monitoring of splanchnic organ oxygen saturation (SpO2) would make the early detection of inadequate tissue oxygenation feasible, reducing the risk of hypoperfusion, severe ischemia, multiple organ failure, and, ultimately, death. In an attempt to create a splanchnic SpO2 sensor that can be used intra-operatively, pre-operatively and post-operatively this paper describes the design and technical evaluation of fiber optic based reflectance pulse oximeter sensor and processing system. In a detailed investigation to determine the optimal source-emitter spacing it was found that the optimum separation distance was between 3mm and 6mm. In vivo thermal testing showed that the rise in temperature at the tip of the fiber at both wavelengths was insignificant and therefore should have no effect in the splanchnic tissue.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information: © 2007 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Humans; Oximetry; Oxygen; Splanchnic Circulation
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
T Technology > TK Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering
Divisions: School of Engineering & Mathematical Sciences > Engineering
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/14299

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