Dissociating effects of acute photic stress on spatial, episodic-like and working memory in the rat.

Passecker, J., Barlow, S. & O'Mara, S. M. (2014). Dissociating effects of acute photic stress on spatial, episodic-like and working memory in the rat.. Behavioural Brain Research, 272(1), pp. 218-225. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2014.07.007

[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (326kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence) - Other
Download (201kB) | Preview

Abstract

Adaptively responding to acute stress has been of great importance for human and animal survival. However, for our species, stress-related disorders are putting an ever-increasing burden on healthcare systems. It is thus crucial to understand the basic processes and cognitive changes associated with acute stress. Here, we examined the effects of acute stress exposure on spatial (water maze) and memory (delayed match to sample and episodic-memory-like tasks) performance. We found striking performance deficits in stressed animals navigating in the water maze. We also found, in an episodic-like memory task, striking object-location deficits, but not in temporal-object association learning in stressed animals. Finally, no differences were apparent for any delay periods (up to 30 s) in a delayed match to sample task. Taken together, these results show a strong differential effect of acute stress on differing memory processes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2014, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords: Acute stress; Spatial memory; Episodic memory; DMTS; Water maze; Reference memory
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Adult Nursing
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/14998

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics