Hacking into the emotion-creativity link Two new approaches to interactive systems that influence the relationship between emotion and creativity

de Rooij, A. (2016). Hacking into the emotion-creativity link Two new approaches to interactive systems that influence the relationship between emotion and creativity. (Unpublished Doctoral thesis, City University London)

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Abstract

Emotions can influence creative thinking. The ability of people to have the emotions that augment creativity can therefore help them to achieve higher creative task performance. How to design interactive systems that can effectively make use of this potential is, however, still an unanswered question. To explore possible answers to this question we have developed two novel approaches to interactive systems that can be used to effectively hack into the emotion-creativity link.

One approach we developed enables a system to hack into the function of motor expressions in emotion regulation, in order to regulate the emotions that happen spontaneously during a creative task. We demonstrate that embodied interactions designed based on motor expressions, while used to interact with a system, can influence an intended emotion, and thereby influence the relationship between emotion and creativity.

The second approach that we developed enables a system to hack into the cognitive appraisal processes that help cause emotion during a creative task. We demonstrate that believable computer generated feedback about the originality of a user’s own ideas, can be manipulated to help cause an intended emotion, determine its intensity, and thereby also influence the relationship between emotion and creativity.

The contribution of this thesis is the development of two novel approaches to interactive systems that aim to influence the emotion-creativity link and in particular the explication of the mechanisms underlying these approaches. The studies form a novel contribution to both interactive systems research and the creativity sciences.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Divisions: School of Informatics > Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/15121

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