Thinking bigger: The Cronbachian paradigm & personality theory integration

Poropat, A. E. & Corr, P. J. (2015). Thinking bigger: The Cronbachian paradigm & personality theory integration. Journal of Research in Personality, 56, pp. 59-69. doi: 10.1016/j.jrp.2014.10.006

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Abstract

Personality theories largely mirror disparities between fundamental paradigms that guide most psychology: one based upon Galton's emphasis on inter-individual differences and the lexical hypothesis; the other inspired by Wundt is focused upon intra-individual processes, such as temperament and Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory. Previous integrations of personality models using these paradigms failed to account for observed variance, suggesting model incommensurability. We propose that a broader conception-developed from Cronbach and colleagues' generalisability theory-provides an effective integrating framework, and show how Galtonian and Wundtian models may be assimilated within Cronbachian approaches. Additionally, Cronbachian models have novel practical implications. Application of the Cronbachian paradigm to personality will be challenging, but provides an opportunity to achieve genuine coherence in personality research.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2015, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords: Personality theory; Generalisability theory; Intra-individual models; Inter-individual models; Theoretical paradigms
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Psychology
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/15855

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