Assessing the knowledge of perinatal mental illness among student midwives

Phillips, L. (2015). Assessing the knowledge of perinatal mental illness among student midwives. Nurse Education in Practice, 15(6), pp. 463-469. doi: 10.1016/j.nepr.2014.09.003

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Abstract

The experience of perinatal mental illness (mental illness occurring around the time of pregnancy) currently affect 1 in 10 women and can have adverse effects on the mother and her child ( Massie and Szajnberg, 2002 ; O'Connor et al., 2002). The care and effective management of women experiencing perinatal mental illness is therefore an important issue for health care staff, managers, psychiatrists, commissioners and campaigners. Midwives play a significant part in caring for women throughout their pregnancies, during labour and up to the first month after birth. Midwives are in a unique position to assess a woman's well-being and to offer appropriate support. However, previous research has revealed that midwives often have poor understanding and knowledge of perinatal mental health issues and require improved training (Ross-Davie et al, 2006; McCann and Clark, 2010).

This research project aims to systematically assess student midwives awareness of perinatal mental illness. The findings of this study will inform curriculum development for graduate and post-graduate midwifery students therefore improving the care and support women with mental illness receive from antenatal services. The findings from this study will also be used for the formation of an educational web-based programme for student and qualified midwives.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Midwifery, Students, Training, Perinatal mental illness
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Mental Health & Learning Disability
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/16498

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