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A randomised, controlled trial of the effects of a mobile telehealth intervention on clinical and patient-reported outcomes in people with poorly controlled diabetes

Baron, J., Hirani, S. P. and Newman, S. P. (2017). A randomised, controlled trial of the effects of a mobile telehealth intervention on clinical and patient-reported outcomes in people with poorly controlled diabetes. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 23(2), pp. 207-216. doi: 10.1177/1357633X16631628

Abstract

Objective

The objective of this research is to determine the effects of mobile telehealth (MTH) on glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and other clinical and patient-reported outcomes in insulin-requiring people with diabetes.

Methods

A nine-month randomised, controlled trial compared standard care to standard care supplemented with MTH (self-monitoring, mobile-phone data transmissions, graphical and nurse-initiated feedback, and educational calls). Clinical (HbA1c, blood pressure, daily insulin dose, diabetes outpatient appointments (DOAs)) and questionnaire data (health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety) were collected. Mean group changes over time were compared using hierarchical linear models and Mann-Whitney tests.

Results

Eighty-one participants with a baseline HbA1c of 8.98% ± 1.82 were randomised to the intervention ( n = 45) and standard care ( n = 36). The Group by Time effect revealed MTH did not significantly influence HbA1c ( p = 0.228), but p values were borderline significant for blood pressure ( p = 0.054) and mental-health related quality of life ( p = 0.057). Examination of effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals for mean group differences at nine months supported the existence of a protective effect of MTH on mental health-related quality of life as well as depression. None of the other measured outcomes were found to be affected by the MTH intervention.

Conclusions

Findings from this study must be interpreted with caution given the small sample size, but they do not support the widespread adoption of MTH to achieve clinically significant changes in HbA1c. MTH may, however, have positive effects on blood pressure and protective effects on some aspects of mental health.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: © SAGE Publications.
Publisher Keywords: Telehealth, mobile health, randomised, controlled trial, patient-reported outcomes, glycosylated haemoglobin
Subjects: R Medicine
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Healthcare Services Research & Management
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/16649
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