A preliminary study of negative appraisals and dysfunctional coping strategies associated with post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms following myocardial infarction

Ayers, S., Copland, C. & Dunmore, E. (2009). A preliminary study of negative appraisals and dysfunctional coping strategies associated with post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms following myocardial infarction. British Journal of Health Psychology, 14(3), pp. 459-471. doi: 10.1348/135910708X349343

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To investigate associations between PTSD symptoms following myocardial infarction (MI) and subjective experience of MI, negative perception of consequences, negative appraisals of symptoms, and use of dysfunctional coping strategies, as described by Ehlers and Clark’s (2000) model of PTSD.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional questionnaire study of people who experienced a MI within the previous 12 weeks (n = 74; 51% response rate).

METHODS: Participants completed questionnaires assessing PTSD symptoms, subjective experience of MI, perception of consequences, appraisal of symptoms, and dysfunctional coping strategies.

RESULTS: Sixteen percent of participants met DSM-IV criteria for PTSD and a further 18% reported moderate to severe PTSD symptoms. People with PTSD symptoms also had more somatic symptoms, anxiety, depression, and social dysfunction. PTSD symptoms were associated with perceived severity and danger of MI, a history of psychological problems, previous trauma, negative appraisal of symptoms, perceived severe consequences, and dysfunctional coping strategies. These variables were entered into a regression with MI and past history variables on Step 1, and appraisal and coping variables on Step 2. This showed that perceived consequences and dysfunctional coping were strongly associated with PTSD symptoms after controlling for MI and past history variables.

CONCLUSION: The results of this preliminary study suggest perception of consequences and dysfunctional coping may be important in PTSD symptoms following MI.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Child Health & Children's Nursing
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/2003

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