HIV infection among ethnic minority and migrant men who have sex with men in Britain

Elford, J., Doerner, R., McKeown, E., Nelson, S., Anderson, J. & Low, N. (2012). HIV infection among ethnic minority and migrant men who have sex with men in Britain. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 39(9), pp. 678-686. doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e31825c8018

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Abstract

Objectives: To examine HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) from different ethnic and migrant groups living in Britain.

Methods: In 2007-2008 a diverse national sample of MSM living in Britain was surveyed online. Men were recruited through websites, in sexual health clinics, bars, clubs and other venues.

Results: 991 ethnic minority MSM, 207 men born in Central or Eastern Europe (CEE), 136 men born in South or Central America (SCA) and 11,944 white British men were included in the analysis. Compared with white British men (13.1%), self-reported HIV prevalence was low for men of South Asian, Chinese and “other Asian” ethnicity (range 0.0-5.8%) and for men born in CEE (4.5%) but elevated for men born in SCA (18.7%) (p<0.001). There were no significant differences between these groups in high risk sexual behaviour (p=0.8). After adjusting for confounding factors in a multivariable model, substantial differences in the odds of HIV infection remained for South Asian and Chinese MSM as well as for migrants from CEE, but not for other groups (compared with white British men) ; e.g. South Asian men, adjusted odds ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval 0.23, 0.79, p=0.007.

Conclusion: Although there were marked differences in self-reported HIV prevalence between ethnic minority, key migrant and white British MSM in this study, we did not find corresponding differences in high risk sexual behaviour. This highlights the importance of health promotion targeting MSM from all ethnic and migrant groups in Britain regardless of HIV prevalence.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Infectious Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASES, PROJECT DESIGN, BLACK-MEN, YOUNG MEN, GAY MEN, RISK, LONDON, DISPARITIES, PREVALENCE, BEHAVIORS, HEALTH
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Healthcare Research Unit
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/3362

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