Direct pulse oximetry within the esophagus, on the surface of abdominal viscera, and on free flaps

Kyriacou, P. A. (2013). Direct pulse oximetry within the esophagus, on the surface of abdominal viscera, and on free flaps. Anesthesia & Analgesia, 117(4), pp. 824-833. doi: 10.1213/ANE.0b013e3182a1bef6

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Abstract

Pulse oximetry is a noninvasive photometric technique that provides information about arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate and has widespread clinical applications. This is accomplished via peripheral pulse oximetry probes mainly attached to the finger, toe, or earlobe. The direct application of pulse oximetry to an organ, such as the esophagus, liver, bowel, stomach or free flap, might provide an indication of how well perfused an organ or a free flap is. Also, the placement of a pulse oximetry probe at a more central site, such as the esophagus, might be more reliable at a time when conventional peripheral pulse oximetry fails.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is not the final published version.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Aged, Esophagus, Female, Fingers, Free Tissue Flaps, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Male, Middle Aged, Oximetry, Photoplethysmography, Pilot Projects, Viscera
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
T Technology
Divisions: School of Engineering & Mathematical Sciences > Engineering
Related URLs:
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/3546

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