Can false memories prime problem solutions?

Howe, M. L., Garner, S. R., Dewhurst, S. & Ball, L. J. (2010). Can false memories prime problem solutions?. Cognition, 117(2), pp. 176-181. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2010.08.009

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Abstract

Previous research has suggested that false memories can prime performance on related implicit and explicit memory tasks. The present research examined whether false memories can also be used to prime higher order cognitive processes, namely, insight-based problem solving. Participants were asked to solve a number of compound remote associate task (CRAT) problems, half of which had been primed by the presentation of Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) lists whose critical lure was also the solution to the problem. The results showed that when the critical lure (a) was falsely recalled, CRAT problems were solved more often and significantly faster than problems that were not primed by a DRM list and (b) was not falsely recalled, CRAT problem solution rates and times were no different than when there was no DRM priming. A second experiment demonstrated that these outcomes were not a simple artifact of the inclusion of a recall test prior to the problem-solving task. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to the previous literature on priming and the adaptive function of false memories.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Cognition. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Cognition Volume 117, Issue 2, November 2010, Pages 176–181, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2010.08.009
Uncontrolled Keywords: False memory, Problem solving, Adaptive memory
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Psychology
Related URLs:
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/4207

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