Is knowledge and practice safer in England after the release of national guidance on the resuscitation of patients in mental health and learning disabilities?

Flood, C., Gull, N., Thomas, B., Gordon, V. & Cleary, K. (2013). Is knowledge and practice safer in England after the release of national guidance on the resuscitation of patients in mental health and learning disabilities?. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 21(9), pp. 806-813. doi: 10.1111/jpm.12126

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Download (383kB) | Preview

Abstract

This paper reports on the issue of resuscitation in mental health inpatient environments. It reviews the literature on national standards and best practice when emergency situations arise in mental health settings. The discussion on the best practice literature takes place alongside the reporting of a national evaluation of how National Patient Safety Agency improvement guidelines for the provision for life support, and resuscitation for mental health service users was effectively implemented across health-care providers in England. Methods used to establish the effective use of the guidelines include feedback from clinical staff and staff responsible for the implementation of the new national standards for resuscitation. Serious incident data were also compared prior to the release of the national guidelines and after the guideline release dates. This included looking at events around choking and cardiac/respiratory arrest in inpatient areas. There were five deaths post-implementation of the guidelines that were considered to have serious enough error associated with the resuscitation process. This was down from 18 prior to the release of the guidelines. However, our survey showed that despite organisations reporting 100% compliance with the implementation of the guidelines, around half of frontline clinical staff were not aware of them. Although our survey responses show a contradiction between organisational and clinical staff awareness, our analysis suggests a reduction in moderate and severe harm cases and of deaths. There is evidence of a reduction in the worst types of error resulting in death, albeit with small numbers.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Uncontrolled Keywords: cardiac arrest, mental health, patient safety, resuscitation
Subjects: R Medicine > RT Nursing
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Mental Health & Learning Disability
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/4512

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics