The roles of encoding and retrieval processes in associative and categorical memory illusions

Dewhurst, S., Bould, E., Knott, L. & Thorley, C. (2009). The roles of encoding and retrieval processes in associative and categorical memory illusions. Journal of Memory & Language, 60(1), pp. 154-164. doi: 10.1016/j.jml.2008.09.002

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Abstract

Four experiments investigated the origin of associative and categorical memory illusions by comparing the effects of study and test associations on Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) and categorized lists. Experiments 1 and 2 found that levels of false recognition with both list types were increased by manipulations that facilitated the generation of associates at study (blocked presentation of study lists and explicit instructions to generate associates of studied items). Experiments 3 and 4 showed that manipulations designed to increase test associations (test-induced priming and part-set cuing) did not increase levels of false memory with either list type. These findings indicate that false memories produced by both DRM and categorized lists are influenced by associations activated at study but not by associations activated at test.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Memory and Language. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 60, Issue 1, January 2009, Pages 154–164, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jml.2008.09.002
Uncontrolled Keywords: False recall, DRM procedure, Category repetition
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Psychology
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/4766

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