Monitoring and optimising outcomes of survivors of critical illness

Aitken, L. M. & Marshall, A. P. (2015). Monitoring and optimising outcomes of survivors of critical illness. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, 31(1), pp. 1-9. doi: 10.1016/j.iccn.2014.10.006

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Abstract

Recovery after critical illness can be protracted and challenging. Compromise of physical, psychological, cognitive and social function is experienced by some patients and may persist for a number of years. Measurement of recovery outcomes at regular time points throughout the critical illness and recovery pathway is necessary to identify problems and guide selection of interventions to prevent, minimise or overcome that compromise. Optimisation of factors that enhance recovery, such as sleep, nutrition and memories of intensive care, will also assist with promotion of recovery.Effective assessment of recovery requires integration of assessment of outcomes into routine clinical practice by all members of the interdisciplinary team. There must be agreement of appropriate measures and measurement timeframes alongside relevant education and training to ensure optimal assessment and use of the information gained. Assessment outcomes need to be communicated to interdisciplinary team members across the critical illness and recovery trajectory. Adequate resourcing for both the assessment activities and subsequent care is essential to improve patient outcomes after critical illness.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Intensive and Critical Care Nursing. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, Volume 31, Issue 1, February 2015, Pages 1–9, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2014.10.006
Uncontrolled Keywords: Critically ill, Intensive care, Patient outcome assessment, Recovery
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Healthcare Research Unit
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/6166

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