Parents' expressed emotion and mood, rather than their physical disability are associated with adolescent adjustment. A longitudinal study of families with a parent with multiple sclerosis

Bogosian, A., Hadwin, J., Hankins, M. & Moss-Morris, R. (2016). Parents' expressed emotion and mood, rather than their physical disability are associated with adolescent adjustment. A longitudinal study of families with a parent with multiple sclerosis. Clinical Rehabilitation, 30(3), pp. 303-311. doi: 10.1177/0269215515580600

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Abstract

Objective. This study investigated the impact of the severity of parental multiple sclerosis, parents’ expressed emotion and psychological well-being on offspring’s psychological difficulties.

Design: A longitudinal study including baseline and 6-month follow-up data collected from parents and children.

Subjects: Adolescents (n=75), their parents with multiple sclerosis (n=56) and the partner without multiple sclerosis (n=40)

Main measures: Parents completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Five Minutes Speech Sample, a standardised interview of expressed emotion towards their child. Parents with multiple sclerosis also completed the Expanded Disability Status Scale, a measure of illness severity. Adolescents completed the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire, a self-report measure of psychological difficulties.

Results: Higher depression scores of the parents with multiple sclerosis at baseline correlated with increased adolescents’ internalising symptoms at 6-month follow-up (γdep=0.31, p=.004). Higher expressed emotion scores of parents with multiple sclerosis at baseline were associated with increased adolescent externalising symptoms at 6-month follow-up (γEE=4.35, p=.052). There was no direct effect of severity, duration or type of multiple sclerosis on adolescents’ adjustment at baseline or follow-up.

Conclusions: Emotional distress and expressed emotion in parents with multiple sclerosis, rather than the severity and type of multiple sclerosis had an impact on adolescents’ psychological difficulties.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2000 - 2015 SAGE Publications
Uncontrolled Keywords: Adolescent children, multiple sclerosis, chronic disability, emotional distress
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Psychology
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/7413

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