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Measuring dynamic levels of self-perceived anxiety and concern during simulated mobility tasks in people with non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

Taylor, D. J. ORCID: 0000-0001-8261-5225, Smith, N. D., Jones, P. R. ORCID: 0000-0001-7672-8397, Binns, A. M. ORCID: 0000-0001-8621-498X and Crabb, D. P. ORCID: 0000-0001-8754-3902 (2019). Measuring dynamic levels of self-perceived anxiety and concern during simulated mobility tasks in people with non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration.. British Journal of Ophthalmology, doi: 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2019-313864

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS: To assess response to real-world mobility scenarios in people with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using a computer-based test.

METHODS: Participants were shown 18 point-of-view computer-based movies simulating walking through real-world scenarios, and pressed a button during scenes which would cause them self-perceived anxiety or concern in their day-to-day life. Button pressure was recorded throughout. Pressure traces were generated, which aligned with each movie time point. Group averages based on AMD severity were generated. Bootstrapped confidence intervals (CIs) for responses by group were generated around traces. Traces were examined to discover events causing the greatest differences between groups.

RESULTS: Participants had early/no AMD (n=8), intermediate AMD (n=7) or geographic atrophy (n=15 (GA)). Median (IQR) logMAR visual acuity was 0.04 (-0.04, 0.18), 0.26 (0.10, 0.40) and 0.32 (0.20, 0.56), respectively. Participants with intermediate AMD or GA recorded greater pressure than those with early and no AMD (Kruskal-Wallis, p=0.04). Four events involving navigating stairs and three under low luminance elicited greatest differences between groups (p<0.001).

CONCLUSION: People with intermediate AMD or GA likely experience higher levels of concern associated with mobility. The test highlights areas of specific concern. Results should be useful in patient management and educating the public about the everyday effects of AMD.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
Subjects: R Medicine > RE Ophthalmology
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Optometry & Visual Science
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/22583
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