City Research Online

An investigation of the flow rates of disposable bottle teats used to feed preterm and medically fragile infants in neonatal units across the UK in comparison with flow rates of commercially available bottle teats

Bell, N. and Harding, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-5192-2027 (2019). An investigation of the flow rates of disposable bottle teats used to feed preterm and medically fragile infants in neonatal units across the UK in comparison with flow rates of commercially available bottle teats. Speech, Language and Hearing, doi: 10.1080/2050571x.2019.1646463

Abstract

Aims and Objectives: For preterm and medically fragile infants, learning to feed orally is challenging. There are many contributing factors that can support the development of oral feeding. The flow rate of a teat can influence feeding success in the bottle-fed infant and, if not supportive, can cause physiological instability during feeding. The flow rate of teats used in a selection of neonatal units in the United Kingdom (UK) was tested to determine their flow rate, which was then compared to the flow rate of commercially available teats.

Design and Methods: Flow rate of teats used in several neonatal units across the UK were tested by attaching a teat to a breast pump and measuring the output of milk after 1 min. These values were compared to the flow rates of commercially available teats. The hypothesis was that hospital disposable teats might have a considerably higher flow rate, and a higher rate of variability, than commercially available teats.

Results and Conclusions: The results identified that there were differing flow rates as well as a wide variation of flow rates for both hospital disposable and commercial teats. Hospital disposable teats had flow rates ranging from 8.5 mL/min to 23.3 mL/min, and commercial teats had a range of 4.2 mL/min to 31.3 mL/min. Measurement of variability in flow rate identified a moderate mean flow rate for hospital disposable teats (CoV = 0.1), with a low mean variability in flow rate for commercial teats (CoV = 0.07). Applicability of this data to a clinical context is discussed.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Speech, Language and Hearing on [26 Jul 2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/2050571X.2019.1646463.
Publisher Keywords: Milk flow rate, suck, swallow breathe (SSB) coordination, preterm infants, medically fragile infants, neonatal care, bottle feeding
Subjects: R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Language & Communication Science
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/22698
[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
Download (390kB) | Preview

Export

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics

Actions (login required)

Admin Login Admin Login