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High-Performance Work Systems and Organizational Performance Across Societal Cultures

Dastmalchian, A., Bacon, N. ORCID: 0000-0002-1031-1246, Satish Kumar, M. and Bayraktar, S. (2019). High-Performance Work Systems and Organizational Performance Across Societal Cultures. Journal of International Business Studies,

Abstract

This paper assesses whether societal culture moderates the relationship between human resource management (HRM) practices and organizational performance. Drawing on matched employer-employee data from 387 organizations and 7,187 employees in 14 countries, our findings show a positive relationship between HRM practices combined in High-Performance Work Systems (HPWS) and organizational performance across societal cultures. Three dimensions of societal culture assessed (power distance, in-group collectivism, and institutional collectivism) did not moderate this relationship. Drawing on the Ability-Motivation-Opportunity (AMO) model, we further consider the effectiveness of three bundles of HRM practices (skill-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing practices). This analysis shows opportunity-enhancing practices (e.g., participative work design and decision-making) are less effective in high-power-distance cultures. Nevertheless, in markedly different countries we find combinations of complementary HPWS and bundles of AMO practices appear to outweigh the influence of societal culture and enhance organizational performance.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in . The definitive publisher-authenticated version Dastmalchian, A., Bacon, N. , Satish Kumar, M. and Bayraktar, S. (2019). High-Performance Work Systems and Organizational Performance Across Societal Cultures. Journal of International Business Studies, is to be available online at: https://www.palgrave.com/gb/journal/41267.
Publisher Keywords: high-performancework systems; societal culture; cross-cultural management; organizational performance
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Departments: Cass Business School > Management
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/23058
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