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An education and negotiation of differences: the ‘schooling’ experiences of English-speaking Canadian children growing up with polio during the 1940s and 1950s

Yoshida, K. K., Shanouda, F. and Ellis, J. (2014). An education and negotiation of differences: the ‘schooling’ experiences of English-speaking Canadian children growing up with polio during the 1940s and 1950s. Disability & Society, 29(3), pp. 345-358. doi: 10.1080/09687599.2013.823080

Abstract

In this paper we present oral narratives focusing on schooling experiences of Canadians who lived with polio as children between 1940 and 1959. We argue that disabled students with polio received an education about the differences ascribed to them by individuals in authority (teachers, principals), by other young people, and through the dominant negative discourses of polio and normalizing, ableist practices of schooling. Using narrative accounts from participants’ interviews, we analyze their school experiences of difference: inaccessible physical and temporal spaces, bullying at school, exclusion from classes, and negotiating youth culture related to shoes, clothes and friendships. However, participants were not passive and they discussed how, along with families, they negotiated and occasionally defied normalizing processes. This research gives voice to a generation of disabled English-speaking Canadians, whose stories about school have not been heard before.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Disability & Society on 04 Sep 2013, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09687599.2013.823080.
Publisher Keywords: disability, polio, children, school, bullying, exclusion
Subjects: L Education
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Departments: School of Health Sciences
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/23170
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