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The treatment of disabled individuals in small, medium-sized, and large firms

Bacon, N. ORCID: 0000-0002-1031-1246 and Hoque, K. (2021). The treatment of disabled individuals in small, medium-sized, and large firms. Human Resource Management, doi: 10.1002/hrm.22084

Abstract

Integrating literature on small firm informality and organizational growth and development into Stone and Colella’s (1996) model of the workplace treatment of disabled individuals, we assess prior claims that disability employment outcomes are better in large firms than in small and medium-sized firms. Drawing on the principle of equifinality, we propose disability employment outcomes (workforce disability prevalence and disability gaps in contentment and job satisfaction) will not vary by firm size, given both the formalized approach of large firms (disability equality practices, HR specialists, and union recognition), and the more informal approach of small firms (greater job autonomy, a stronger fairness culture, better work-life balance, and single-site operations with closer personal relationships) may have benefits for disabled people. Analyzing nationally representative matched employer-employee data, we show, as anticipated, formalized approaches are more prevalent in large firms (and to an extent medium-sized firms) and informal approaches are more prevalent in small firms, and disability employment outcomes do not vary by firm size. However, this appears to reflect the ineffectiveness (rather than effectiveness) of characteristics and practices associated with both large firm formality and small firm informality, with both being weakly associated with better disability employment outcomes.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Bacon, N. and Hoque, K. (2021). The treatment of disabled individuals in small, medium-sized, and large firms. Human Resource Management, which is published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/hrm.22084. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Departments: Bayes Business School > Management
Date available in CRO: 27 Jul 2021 14:24
Date deposited: 27 July 2021
Date of acceptance: 26 July 2021
Date of first online publication: 1 September 2021
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/26511
[img] Text - Accepted Version
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