Pleasure and the Control of Food Intake: An Embodied Cognition Approach to Consumer Self‐Regulation

Petit, O., Basso, F., Merunka, D., Spence, C., Cheok, A. D. & Oullier, O. (2016). Pleasure and the Control of Food Intake: An Embodied Cognition Approach to Consumer Self‐Regulation. Psychology & Marketing, 33(8), pp. 608-619. doi: 10.1002/mar.20903

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Abstract

Consumers try to avoid temptation when exposed to appetizing foods by diverting their attention away from their senses (e.g., sight, smell, mouthfeel) and bodily states (e.g., state of arousal, salivation) in order to focus on their longer term goals (e.g., eating healthily, achieving an ideal body weight). However, when not including sensations in their decision‐making processes, consumers risk depleting their self‐regulatory resources, potentially leading to unhealthy food choices. Conversely, based on the concept of “embodied self‐regulation,” the suggestion is made that considering bodily states may help consumers regulate their food choices more effectively. A new model is proposed that facilitates understanding observed consumer behavior and the success or failure of self‐control in food intake. It is argued that bodily states and sensory information should be considered when modeling consumer behavior and developing health‐related advocacy and communication campaigns. The model proposed here leads to new perspectives on consumer consumption behavior and health policy research and strategies.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Petit, O., Basso, F., Merunka, D., Spence, C., Cheok, A. D. & Oullier, O. (2016). Pleasure and the Control of Food Intake: An Embodied Cognition Approach to Consumer Self‐Regulation. Psychology & Marketing, 33(8), pp. 608-619, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/mar.20903. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
Departments: School of Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering > Computer Science
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/19528

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