City Research Online

Modern Transference of Domestic Cooking Skills

Lavelle, F., Benson, T., Hollywood, L., Surgenor, D., McCloat, A., Mooney, E., Caraher, M. ORCID: 0000-0002-0615-839X and Dean, M. (2019). Modern Transference of Domestic Cooking Skills. Nutrients, 11(4), 870.. doi: 10.3390/nu11040870

Abstract

As the primary source of learning cooking skills; it is vital to understand what mothers think about the transference of cooking skills to their children. The current analysis aimed to highlight mothers' perceptions of children's involvement and cooking practices within the home setting. Sixteen focus group discussions were conducted on the island of Ireland (Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland [UK]) with 141 mothers aged 20-39 years old. All focus groups were transcribed verbatim and an inductive thematic analysis using NVivo software was undertaken. Seven themes emerged from the dataset; (1) "How we learned to cook"; (2) "Who's the boss"; (3) "Children in the way"; (4) "Keep kids out"; (5) "Involvement means eating"; (6) "Intentions versus reality"; and (7) "Kids' 'interest' in cooking". These themes illustrate a lack of cooking skill transference in relation to everyday meal preparation in modern times. The culture of children in the kitchen has vastly changed; and opportunities for children to learn basic skills are currently limited. Further research is required to confirm the findings that emerged from this analysis.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Publisher Keywords: cooking; learning; mothers; children; adolescents; obesity; qualitative; environmentalinfluences
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Departments: School of Arts & Social Sciences > Sociology > Food Policy
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/22110
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