Does mode of administration affect health-related quality-of-life outcomes after stroke?

Caute, A., Northcott, S., Clarkson, L., Pring, T. & Hilari, K. (2012). Does mode of administration affect health-related quality-of-life outcomes after stroke?. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 14(4), pp. 329-337. doi: 10.3109/17549507.2012.663789

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Abstract

Telephone interviews and postal surveys may be a resource-efficient way of assessing health-related quality-of-life post-stroke, if they produce data equivalent to face-to-face interviews. This study explored whether telephone interviews and postal surveys of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale (SAQOL-39g) yielded similar results to face-to-face interviews. Participants included people with aphasia and comprised two groups: group one (n =22) were 3-6 months post-stroke; group two (n =26) were ≥1 year post-stroke. They completed either a face-to-face and a telephone interview or a face-to-face interview and a postal survey of the SAQOL-39g. Response rates were higher for group two (87%) than for group one (72-77%). There were no significant differences between respondents and non-respondents on demographics, co-morbidities, stroke severity, or communication impairment. Concordance between face-to-face and telephone administrations (.90-.98) was excellent; and very good-excellent between face-to-face and postal administrations (.84-.96), although scores in postal administrations were lower (significant for psychosocial domain and overall SAQOL-39g in group two). These findings suggest that the SAQOL-39g yields similar results in different modes of administration. Researchers and clinicians may employ alternative modes, particularly in the longer term post-stroke, in order to reduce costs or facilitate clients with access difficulties.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Health-related quality-of-life, stroke outcome, mode of administration, aphasia Health-related quality-of-life, stroke outcome, mode of administration, aphasia
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Language & Communication Science
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/1099

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