Are High Performance Work Practices (HPWPs) enabling or disabling? Exploring the relationship between selected HPWPs and work-related disability disadvantage

Bacon, N., Hoque, K., Wass, V. & Jones, M. (2017). Are High Performance Work Practices (HPWPs) enabling or disabling? Exploring the relationship between selected HPWPs and work-related disability disadvantage. Human Resource Management,

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Abstract

Drawing on Stone and Colella (1996), this paper develops competing ‘enabling’ and ‘disabling’ effects hypotheses concerning the potential relationship between High Performance Work Practices (HPWPs) and work-related disability disadvantage, and also argues that this relationship will depend on the nature of the workplace’s disability equality climate. The paper draws on matched establishment-employee data from the nationally representative 2011 Workplace Employment Relations Study (WERS) in Britain to evaluate these issues empirically. The results suggest limited support for the ‘disabling effects’ hypothesis by demonstrating that the proportion of the workforce that is disabled is lower in workplaces making greater use of HPWPs, although this relationship is found to be moderated by the nature of the equality climate. There is, however, only limited evidence to suggest that gaps in work-related well-being between disabled workers and their non-disabled counterparts vary with the use of HPWPs.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Bacon, N., Hoque, K., Wass, V. & Jones, M. (2017). Are High Performance Work Practices (HPWPs) enabling or disabling? Exploring the relationship between selected HPWPs and work-related disability disadvantage, which will be published in final form in Human Resource Management at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1099-050X/. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Divisions: Cass Business School > Faculty of Finance
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/16650

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